Current research

Current Research 740x300

Our PhD students are undertaking hydrogen research in a wide variety of areas.

Systems

Cheryl Duke120x150

 

Cheryl Duke     

University of Nottingham  (started 2021)

 

Research area: Quantifying environmental and resource impacts of the future UK hydrogen fuelled vehicle fleet.

 

 

Project description
This project develops novel LCA models to assess the resource and environmental implications of deploying hydrogen fuelled vehicles in the UK’s light and heavy duty road fleets. Cheryl will consider the current and future mix of hydrogen production routes, vehicle manufacture, use and end-of-life vehicle management.
 

 

Supervisor

Professor Jon McKechnie

 
Stakeholder collaboration
 
 

Stephen Marr120x150

Stephen Marr

Loughborough University (started 2020)

 

Research area: Development of techniques and methods for sampling, calibration and testing of hydrogen purity for fuel cell vehicles.

 
Project description

Measurement challenges for hydrogen fuel cells are preventing the overall sector from growing. The project Stephen is looking at aims to develop a cylinder passivation technology, providing temporal stability data for the 14 trace contaminants outlined in ISO 14687-2. 

 
Supervisors
Dr Ben Buckley, Professor Upul Wijayantha, Dr Paul Holland.
 

 

Stakeholder collaboration
 
 

 

 

Katarina Pegg120x150

 

Katarina Pegg     

University of Birmingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: The role of green hydrogen in the West Midlands Combined Authority local energy system.

 

 

 

Project description

Green hydrogen production from weather dependent low carbon generation is an area of growth signposted in the UK Committee on Climate Change’s 6th Carbon Budget (published December 2020); which provides UK Government Ministers with advice on the volume of greenhouse gases the UK can emit during the period 2033-2037. Katarina’s research will focus on the advantages and disadvantages of green hydrogen generation at a local level, specifically within the West Midlands Combined Authority area.

 
Supervisors

Dr Grant Wilson, Professor Bushra Al-Duri.

 
 

 

 

Salim Ubale120x150

Salim Ubale     

University of Nottingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: Optimisation of hydrogen fuelling station operation and maintenance to maximise performance and resilience of key infrastructure.

 

Project description
It is desirable to maximise performance of hydrogen refuelling stations, not just for economic reasons, but to deliver the best customer experience. Salim's project seeks to optimise the plant operation, where planning preventative maintenance can help reduce disruption to service and improve the commercial case of a plant.
 
Supervisors

Dr Rasa Remenyte-Prescott, Prof. Gavin Walker, Dr Matt Lees,

Dr Philip Wilson         

 
Stakeholder collaboration
 
 

 

 

 

Amit Pic120x150

 

Amit Verma     

Loughborough University (started 2020)

 

Research area: Understanding the potential of hydrogen technology adoption in a complex challenging energy system.

 

 

 

Project description
Amit is looking at existing energy systems and potential hydrogen technologies on economic, technological, and engineering grounds to evaluate their potential for successful adoption. He will also analyse how they support or hinder development of these technologies, and give an understanding of what needs to change.
 

 

Supervisors

Professor Monica Giulietti, Prof. David Saal, Prof. Upul Wijayantha. 

 
 

 

Joseph Walton - 91 X 150

 

Joseph Walton 

University of Birmingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Business cases for green hydrogen

 

Project description
Hydrogen employed in sustainable and emission-reducing projects needs to be sourced from ‘green’ feedstock and energy. Nevertheless, the majority of hydrogen sold today is ‘black’ and produced by steam reforming of natural gas. There are cost issues. Joseph is looking into how green hydrogen can be costed, so that it is more compatible working with today’s energy system. 
 

 

Supervisor
Professor Robert Steinberger-Wilckens.
 
 

 

Production

Ruth Atkinson120x150

 

Ruth Atkinson

University of Nottingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: Designing efficient charge-transfer metal-semiconductors heterojunctions for hydrogen generation.

 
Project description
Ruth's project assesses metal-semiconductor combinations for suitability as photocatalysts for the generation of hydrogen from water. Materials based on Nb semiconductors with metals such as Co, Cu, Ni or Mo will be explored. They will be synthesised, characterized and tested for the generation of hydrogen from water.
 

 

 Supervisors

Dr Anabel Lanterna, Professor Elena Besley.

 

 

 

 

Alexandra Brochoire - 102 X 150

 

Alexandra Brochoire

University of Birmingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Proton exchange membrane water electrolysers with thin film nanostructured electrodes.

 
Project description
The challenge with current proton exchange membrane water electrolysers (PEMWE) is poor power performance and durability; mainly caused by large mass transfer losses and degradation of electrode structure, from random electrode structure from catalyst nanoparticles. Alexandra will seek to develop a new generation of catalyst electrodes from aligned IrO2- and metal oxide-based nanowires for PEMWE applications; taking advantage of the high stability of nanowires and boosted mass transfer characteristics of nanowire arrays unique thin catalyst layers.
 
Supervisors

Dr Shanfeng Du, Dr Neil Rees.

 

Jack Castle120x150

 

Jack Castle     

University of Nottingham (started 2019)

 

Research area: Sustainable electrocatalysts for hydrogen generation.

 

Project description
Jack carries out research into the development and use of polyoxometalates (POMs) as electrocatalysts, that facilitate both the oxygen and the hydrogen evolution reactions during electrolytic water splitting. He is particularly interested in the development of POM-carbon nanotube composites.
 
Supervisors

Dr Darren Walsh, Dr Graham Newton, Dr Ming Li.

 

 

 
 

 

Adedayo Dada - 95 X 150

 

Adedayo Dada

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Highly efficient molecular hydrogen-evolution catalysts.

 

 

Project description
Molecular hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts allow efficient hydrogen production from water under mild conditions. Adedayo will research development of fully tailorable molecular clusters based on molybdenum/tungsten and sulfur/oxygen. Systems will be combined with conductive nanocarbon materials to develop highly efficient composite electrocatalysts for the water splitting reaction. The stability and efficiency of these systems will be explored during prolonged electrolysis. 
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Graham Newton, Dr Lee Johnson.

 

 

 

 

Mickella Dawkins120x150

 

Mickella Dawkins     

Loughborough University (started 2019)

 

Research area: Hydrogen enrichment of natural gas by thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane.

 

 

Project description
The gas network currently supplies natural gas to consumers but could instead supply gases, such as hydrogen, in the future. Thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane allows enrichment of natural gas with hydrogen, a carbon-free fuel. Mickella's research is focused on the development of this technology and the incorporation of wind energy.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr James Reynolds, Professor Sandie Dann and Professor David Saal.

 
Stakeholder collaboration
 

 

 

 

Kieran Heeley120x150

Kieran Heeley     

University of Birmingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Algal biomass to hydrogen: a circular approach for green sustainable processing with enhanced efficiency and minimal waste.

 
Project description

Kieran's project investigates hydrothermal conversion of algal biomass to H2-rich gas, in a sustainable circular approach. It looks at optimising the catalyst, feedstock and operating conditions to increase the hydrogen yield; whilst maximising the nutrient recovery.

 
Supervisors

Professor Bushra Al-Duri, Dr Rafael Orozco, Professor Lynne Macaskie.

 
 
Adam McKinley120x130

Adam McKinley     

Loughborough University (started 2019)

Research area: Catalyst development for low-cost, large-scale sustainable hydrogen production from seawater and renewable energy

 
Project description
Catalyst development for low-cost large-scale sustainable hydrogen production from seawater and renewable energy. Adam is looking at the oxygen evolution and hydrogen production, via seawater splitting, driven by renewable energy. He is interested in the production and utilisation of low-cost, highly efficient and highly selective catalysts for the process. 
 

 

Supervisors

Professor Wen-Feng Lin, Professor Jin Xuan, Dr Darren Walsh. 

 
 

 

Jai-Ram Mistry120x150

 

Jai-Ram Mistry

 Loughborough University (started 2019)

 

Research area: Photocatalytic covalent organic frameworks for hydrogen production and storage

 
Project description
Research area: Photocatalytic covalent organic frameworks for hydrogen production and storage. Jai undertakes research into the use of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) for hydrogen production and storage, as apposed to the popular MOF alternative. The project involves the synthesis of new molecules which can be functionalised onto the surface of COFs; creating photocatalytic and size-specific channels which will permit hydrogen production from water and selective ingress, storage and egress.
 
Supervisors

Dr Iain Wright, Dr Simon Kondrat. 

 
 

 

Mulako Dean Mukelabai120x150

 

Mulako Mukelabai

Loughborough University (started 2021)

 

Research area: Renewable hydrogen production to transition to clean cooking.

 
Project description
Mulako's project aims to develop technical and business models, and processes that will enable hydrogen produced from renewable energy to be utilised for cooking.This process is understood; however, the system needs not just the right technology, it also needs the development of the right business model, human capacity and social acceptance to bring about the transformation of traditional cooking practices. 
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Richard Blanchard, Professor Upul Wijayantha, Dr Alastair Livesey.

 

 

 

 

CourtneyQuinn2120x150

 

Courtney Quinn

University of Nottingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Sustainable hydrogen evolution catalysts.

 

 

 

Project description
The development of composite systems, based on molecular metal oxide nanoclusters and ionic liquids, is being investigated by Courtney. The ionic liquids will allow the stabilisation of the molecular catalysts into thin films, membranes and 3D-printed superstructures. Then research will be undertaken to explore the stability and efficiency of these systems during prolonged electrolysis. 
 
Supervisors

Dr Graham Newton, Dr Darren Walsh, Dr Lee Johnson.

 
 

 

Aryamman Sanyal120x150

 

Aryamman Sanyal

Loughborough University (started 2021)

 

Research area: Reactor design and performance optimisation for catalytic hydrogen production from methane.

 
Project description
Aryamman's project aims to design, develop and test hydrogen generation reactor suitable for advanced catalyst, that demonstrate high H2 yield and efficient carbon separation. Natural gas into hydrogen and graphite has the potential to be highly disruptive and presents substantial value, if the process can be scaled up to commercial quantities. 
 
Supervisors

Professor Weeratunge Malalasekera, Professor Upul Wijayantha.

 
 

 

Jack Shacklock120X150

 

Jack Shacklock

Loughborough University (started 2020)

Research area: Lowering the H2 cost in methane cracking technology by using solid carbon as an energy storage material.

 
Project description

Jack’s research is designed to investigate the systematic alteration of process conditions to obtain value-added solid carbon, specifically for energy storage, whilst still maintaining a high yield of hydrogen. Initial studies have been conducted to improve the methane cracking process to increase yield and longevity. By-product carbon has separated in batch processes and been studied in electrochemical supercapacitors, demonstrating a high rate of performance compared to commercial carbon used for supercapacitor manufacturing. These results suggest lowering the cost of turquoise hydrogen, by finding applications for by-product carbon, is promising. Further studies are currently underway to separate by-product carbon in real-time operation (as opposed to batch process) and evaluate their performance in applications.

 

 

Supervisors

Professor Upul Wijayantha, Dr Niladri Banerjee.

 
 
 

Storage

Bakhtawar Ahmed - 119 X 150

 

Bakhtawar Ahmed 

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Sustainable catalysts for low temperature and pressure ammonia synthesis.

 
Project description

Ammonia’s use as a hydrogen rich energy vector – not just for more efficiently moving energy to different markets but also for direct combustion of ammonia as a fuel decarbonising heavy vehicle use in road freight, rail and marine sectors – is attracting interest.

Production of ammonia (via Haber Bosch process) requires high temperatures (300-450°C) and pressure (150-200 bar). This makes the process unsuitable for small scale intermittent ammonia generation, for example via distributed generation coupled with wind or solar renewable energy. More agile ammonia synthesis needs a catalyst operating at lower temperature/pressure. Ruthenium is currently the only catalyst that has acceptable kinetics at low temperatures. 

Bakhtawar’s project will investigate sustainable catalysts, avoiding resource limited platinum group metals.

 

 

Supervisors

Professor Gavin Walker, Dr Marcus Adams, Dr Matthew Wadge.

 

 

 

 

BADGE_SusHy_CDT_120x150

 

Antonia Dase

University of Nottingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Dehydrogenation catalysis of mixed metal borohydride ammoniates.

 
Project description
Antonia is developing novel catalysts for the dehydrogenation of mixed metal borohydride ammoniates, and seeks to elucidate the mechanisms involved in order to improve reaction conditions and selectivity.
 

 

Supervisors

Professor Deborah Kays, Professor Gavin Walker.

 
 
Edward Jones120x150

Edward Jones

Loughborough University (started 2019)

Research area:  Neutron spectroscopy of surface intermediates on nanoporous metal catalysts for H2 storage technologies.

 

Project description
Ed is using neutron spectroscopy to study reaction intermediate speciation and diffusional properties of cobalt catalysed CO/CO2 hydrogenation and borohydride decomposition, for hydrogen storage.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Simon Kondrat, Professor Sandie Dann, Professor Ian Silverwood.

 

 

Stakeholder collaboration
 

 

 

 

Thomas Liddy - 103 x 150

 

Thomas Liddy

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

Research area: Insights on metal nanoclusters (de)hydrogenation for onboard hydrogen storage application using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques.

 
Project description
Development of volumetric efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials is crucial for transport sector decarbonisation. Magnesium hydride nanoparticles are among the most promising H2 storage materials, due to high H2 storage capacity (7.6 wt.%) and low cost ($3/kg). However, slow kinetics and high working temperature (ca. 250 ⁰C) limit commercial application for onboard H2 storage. To improve its properties (higher kinetics, lower temperature) Thomas’s project will utilise metal nanoclusters (MNCs); which are fundamentally different compared to more widely used metal nanoparticles (diameters >2 nm), where majority of metal atoms remain ‘hidden’ within the lattice, excluded from participation in useful chemistry.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Jesum Alves Fernandes, Professor David Grant.

 
Stakeholder collaboration
 

 

 
Samuel Lines120x150

 

Samuel Lines

University of Nottingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: Computational modelling of solid-state hydrogen storage materials.

 
Project description
Samuel's project aims to understand the composition-structure-property correlations of solid-state hydrogen storage materials, through accurate density functional theory simulations of existing and hypothetical materials. The most promising candidate materials discovered from the simulations will be synthesised and characterised, and their hydrogen storage properties will be validated by experiments. 
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Sanliang Ling, Professor Gavin Walker, Professor David Grant.

 
 

 

Isabelle Marriott - 100 X 150

 

Isabelle Marriott 

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Base metal catalysis of acceptorless alcohol dehydrogenation for hydrogen storage.

 
Project description

Catalytic acceptorless alcohol dehydrogenation is an atom-economical approach for alcohol oxidation, without need for an oxidant.

Reversible dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalysis from this reaction provides a route to the use of organic molecules derived from biomass as liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs). Alcohols such as ethylene glycol, glycerol and the C4-C6 analogues erythritol, xylitol and sorbitol are considered to be potentially useful biomass-derived feedstocks; derived from agricultural or lumber resources, including waste streams and gravimetric hydrogen storage capacities, meeting targets set by the EU and the US Department of Energy. 

Isabelle’s project will investigate a range of low coordinate and pincer complexes of the first-row transition metals in order to achieve the acceptorless dehydrogenation reactions and, with appropriate candidates, investigate the possibility of undertaking the reverse reaction with addition of H2.

 

 

Supervisors

Professor Deborah Kays, Professor Peter Licence.

 
 
Alex McGrath120x150

 

Alex McGrath

University of Nottingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Synthesis and characterisation of metal alloys for hydrogen storage and related applications.

 
Project description
Alex's project aims to experimentally synthesise new metal alloys shortlisted by computational screening; and characterise their physical, chemical and structural nature along with their thermodynamic and kinetic properties, during hydrogenation and de-hydrogenation.
 

 

Supervisors

Professor David Grant, Professor Gavin Walker, Dr Sanliang Ling, Dr Kandavel Manickam.

 

 

Stakeholder collaboration
 
 

 

Oliver Morrison120x150

 

Oliver Morrison

University of Nottingham (started 2019)

 

Research area: Hydrogenation of storage materials.

 
Project description
Oliver is applying machine learning models to run accurate molecular dynamic simulations, with an emphasis on understanding the (de)hydrogenation reactions in metal hydrides. A more detailed understanding of these reactions will inform the selection of improved hydrogen storage materials.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Sanliang Ling, Professor Gavin Walker, Professor David Grant.  

 

 

 

 

BADGE_SusHy_CDT_120x150

 

Una O'Hara     

University of Birmingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Development of high-performance complex hydrides.

 
Project description
Here Una is investigating boron-based and nitrogen-based complex hydrides which will be synthesized by chemical and mechanochemical routes (or sourced); and their hydrogen storage, electrical, and thermal properties will be assessed in detail.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Daniel Reed, Professor David Book.

 
 
Jacob Prosser120x150

 

Jacob Prosser

University of Nottingham (started 2019)

 

Research area: High capacity mixed metal borohydrides ammoniates for hydrogen energy storage applications.

 
Project description
Jacob undertakes research into mixed metal borohydride ammoniates (MMBAs) as alternative hydrogen storage materials. He is interested in the synthesis of novel MMBAs, elucidating the reaction mechanisms responsible for the decomposition process and investigating catalysts to accelerate the release of hydrogen.
 

 

Supervisors

Professor Gavin Walker, Professor David Grant, Dr Kandavel Manickam.

 
 

 

Chris Ryder120x150

 

Chris Ryder

University of Nottingham (started 2019)

 

Research area: High-throughput cycling coupled XPS of hydrogen storage materials.

 
Project description
Chris's research looks into the application of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to samples in high-pressure environments. He is particularly interested in developing a method which extends XPS to pressures compatible with hydrogen storage.
 

 

Supervisors

Dr James O’Shea, Professor Gavin Walker, Professor David Grant.

 
 

 

Yassin Ziar120x150

 

Yassin Ziar

University of Nottingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: Modular additive manufacturing

for next-generation hydrogen storage.

 
Project description

Compact hydrogen storage is a challenge for hydrogen vehicles, with current vessels being too large and operating at high pressures. Solid state metal hydrides (MH) can store large quantities of hydrogen in smaller volumes and at lower pressure but have not made it to market, as suitable vessels have not been developed. Yassin's project will investigate the design and manufacture of a new compact MH storage vessel.

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Ian Maskery, Professor Gavin Walker. 

 

 

 


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Emily Dunkerley - 119 X 150

 

Emily Dunkerley     

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Advanced hydrogen sensing platform based on functionalised metal-organic frameworks.

 
Project description

Developing efficient sensor materials with superior performance for selective, fast and sensitive hydrogen detection is essential for environmental protection and human health. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) – crystalline and porous solid materials constructed from metal nodes (metal ions or clusters) and functional organic ligands – are of interest for gas sensing for their large surface area, adjustable pore size, tunable functional sites and intriguing properties; such as electrical conductivity, magnetism, ferroelectricity, luminescence and chromism. 

Emily’s project aims to fabricate novel multi-functional MOFs with improved sensitivity and stability for hydrogen detection. 

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Oluwafunmilola Ola, Professor Gavin Walker, Professor Elena Besley.

 

 

 
Niko Hilmi - 84 X 150

 

Niko Hilmi     

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Composite membranes for H2 purification

 
Project description

H2 is a high quality and clean energy carrier. Most hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming, followed by water-gas shift reaction, with bio-hydrogen production increasing. Before hydrogen is used in fuel cell and other applications CO2 and CH4 resulting from production processes has to be removed. Membrane-based separation technologies are promising alternatives to conventional separation technologies, i.e: pressure swing adsorption, due to low energy consumption. 

Niko’s project will explore development of metal-organic frameworks (MOF)/polymer mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) with enhanced H2 selectivity, to enable membrane based H2 purification.

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Begum Tokay, Dr  Andrea Laybourn

 

 

Stakeholder collaboration
 
 
Patrick Powell120x150

 

Patrick Powell     

University of Birmingham (started 2021)

 

Research area: The use of hydrogen as a processing gas to produce rare earth magnets.

 
Project description

Hydrogen is used in the conventional production of sintered (rare earth) neodymium-iron-boron magnets and in the recycling of these materials. In recent years new methods to manufacture rare earth magnets based on a process called the Hydrogen Ductilisation Process have been found. This process reduces the number of processing steps, reduces waste and could give a significant economic advantage to magnet manufacture.

However, the process is far from optimised and the aim of Patrick’s project will be to develop this process.

 

 

Supervisors

Professor Allan Walton, Dr Richard Sheridan, Professor David Book.

 

 

 
Luke Thompson - 88 X 150

 

Luke Thompson     

University of Nottingham (started 2022)

 

Research area: Efficient hydrogen separation using proton-conducting ceramic membranes and electrochemical cells

 

 

Project description

Most hydrogen used today is produced from fossil fuels. Product gases consist mainly of H2 and CO2, and other impurity gases (CH4 and CO). Energy efficient and low-cost hydrogen separation constitutes a crucial process to move towards a hydrogen economy. 

Luke’s project aims to achieve energy efficient and low-cost hydrogen separation using proton-conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen rich streams, generated through reforming of natural gas, as well as onsite purification of hydrogen close to the point of end use for dilute hydrogen streams.

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Ming Li, Dr Begum Tokay, Professor David Grant.

 

 

 

 

Safety

Hazir Abbasi120X150

 

Hazhir Ebne-Abbasi

Ulster University (started 2020)

 

Research area: Assessment and mitigation of hydrogen-fuelled vehicle hazards

 
Project description
The project Hazhir is exploring aims to close knowledge gaps associated with safety of high-pressure hydrogen storage relevant to hydrogen-fuelled transport; and to develop novel engineering models for such areas as predicting thermal condition of tank structure, safe fuelling and defueling of onboard tanks and prevention of tank rupture in a fire, etc. 
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Dmitriy Makarov, Professor Vladimir Molkov.

 

 

 

 

Atish Gawale - 107 X 150

 

Atish Gawale     

Ulster University (started 2022)

 

Research area: Safety strategies and engineering solutions for hydrogen heavy-duty vehicles.

 
Project description

Pursuit of a low carbon economy means practical implementation of zero-emission applications, including hydrogen-fuelled heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) such as buses and trucks. Hydrogen’s use in public transport implies stringent bus design requirements. 

Atish’s project will review ‘old’ and new HDV hazards of different designs and sectors; identifying and analysing existing prevention and mitigation safety strategies, engineering solutions, knowledge gaps and technological bottlenecks in provision of HDV safety. 

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Sergii Kashkarov, Dr Dmitriy Makarov, Professor Vladimir Molkov.

 
 

 

Mina120X150

 

Mina Kazemi     

Ulster University (started 2020)

 

Research area: Hazards and mitigation of hydrogen releases in underground parking.

 
Project description
The scope of Mina's doctoral study includes the identification and prioritisation of relevant knowledge gaps, performing analytical and numerical studies to close identified knowledge gaps; and the development of innovative safety strategies and engineering solutions to prevent and mitigate accidents with hydrogen powered vehicles in confined infrastructures, specifically carparks. 
 

 

Supervisors

Dr Sile Brennan, Dr Dmitriy Makarov, Professor Vladimir Molkov.

 

 

 

 

Srinivas Sivaraman120x150

 

Srinivas Sivaraman

Ulster University (started 2021)

 

Research area: Safety of using ammonia in the hydrogen economy.

 
Project description

The use of ammonia in industries and its transportation offers practical, cost-effective storage and transport of large quantities of hydrogen.

Using ammonia as hydrogen carrier, calls for a reassessment of hazards and risks. Srinivas's project aims to develop safety strategies and solutions for handling large quantities of ammonia used as a hydrogen carrier during transport, storage onboard and using in relevant infrastructure.

 

 

Supervisors

Dr Dmitriy Makarov, Professor Vladimir Molkov, Dr Volodymyr Shentsov.

 

 

 

 

Distribution

Harvey Craddock-Monroe120x150

 

Harvey Craddock-Monroe

Loughborough University (started 2020)

 

Research area: Development of odour additives for use in hydrogen technology.

 
Project description

The remit of the project Harvey is undertaking involves the design and synthesis of new odour additives for hydrogen storage, and then benchmarking them against the current industry standard(s). 

 

Supervisors

Dr Marc Kimber, Dr Gareth Pritchard.

 

 

 

Samir Soares120x150

 

 

Samir Soares

University of Nottingham (started 2020)

 

Research area: Hydrogen for a sustainable built environment.

 
Project description
Samir's research builds upon significant existing investment that created a unique hydrogen research facility at the Creative Energy Homes. The project will produce a working demonstrator, including control for hydrogen as a Novel Multi-Energy Vector  for Hydrogen Energy Generation-Storage-Use in the built environment. 
 

Supervisors

Professor Mark Gillott, Professor Gavin Walker.

 
 
 

Combustion

Will Bowling120x150

 

Will Bowling 

University of Nottingham (started 2019)

 

Research area: Experimental study of advanced ammonia fuelled heavy duty IC engines under low load operator.

 

 

Project description
Will is undertaking research in Turbulent Jet Ignition technology, enabling the use of ammonia as a fuel. Specific interests surround producing a zero carbon internal combustion engine platform, that gives similar efficiencies to a larger fuel cell vehicle. 
 
Supervisors

Prof Alasdair Cairns, Dr Antonino La Rocca, Dr Richard Jefferson-Loveday. 

 
 

Zak Waite 2020120X150

 

 

Zak Waite

University of Nottingham  (started 2020)

 

Research area: To a 100% hydrogen domestic boiler.

 
Project description

Zak's project seeks to redesign the domestic boiler so that hydrogen can be used as a network fuel.

At the moment because methane, which is currently used, burns quite differently from hydrogen our current domestic boilers cannot be used.  

 

Supervisors

Dr Donald Giddings, Professor David Grant, Professor Robin Irons.

 

 

 

Stakeholder collaboration
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